almostwitty: (monkey)

Google are proudly trumpeting their new Stories feature, which basically automates the tiresome thing of organising your photos – assuming you’ve let Google+ upload all your photos to the cloud for you. And it’s a pretty nifty automatic feature.

Perhaps too automatic. Because left to its own devices, this is what it trumpeted as one of my more recent stories…

What Google+ Stories did with one of @almostwitty's photos What Google+ Stories did with one of @almostwitty’s photos

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (monkey)

I wonder what was going through these web designers when they were asked to create a support site for GCSE Computing Students.

Because they came up with a web design that would have been cutting-edge in 1999… It has animated spinning gifs, tiled backgrounds, thick buttons, thick headers and all-red text. They really should have thrown in flashing text and a scrolling banner to make it the ultimate homage.

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (evil)

While walking through West London, I got a sneak peek at Foursquare’s new expansion plans …

Foursquare

I wonder how many points one gets for checking in there… ;)

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (evil)

The trouble with the world of the Internet is that everybody is now a publisher. Everyone can write what they want, and publish it – so EVERYONE thinks they’re a writer, or creator of content, and there’s no quality control. Thus, what has become more important than the ability to publish is the ability to write something that someone else “likes”, in the words of Facebook.

And finally, after 15 years of being on the Internet, this has kinda happened. (Well, it happened a few times for me in my early career, but not lately).

Qype – a Europe-wide reviews site – has seen fit to name me Qyper of the Week for a review I wrote of a Brazillian grill last year. So, y’know, this is an achievement of sort…

I'm Qyper of the week!

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (evil)

I don’t know if anyone’s ever managed to try for a webtest, and get zero percent – ie nothing, but I managed it for the BBC’s How Musical are you? LabUK test.

0%. Nothing. it means I got very very few answers right.

I could blame it on feeling ill, with a cold that’s zapping me of all energy. Or the stress of waiting for the arrival of WeaponX. Or just accept the fact I’m musically retarded.

Still, it didn’t stop the BBC from suggesting a few musical programmes for an obviously musically deaf person such as myself:

My Musical test results and recommendations

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (evil)

Ob. disclaimer: My views alone

Wikileaks released a bunch of war logs. Nobody really cared.

Wikileaks released more war logs, essentially stating for the record what everyone suspected. Nobody really cared.

Then Wikileaks released the US diplomatic cable logs, essentially stating what everyone suspected.

Suddenly, domain names, servers and services are being attacked and shutdown on ever-more spurious criteria. Julian Assange is enemy no.1, hunted across Europe and arrested in the UK – and you’d have thought it’d be easy to find an Albino Australian.

It’s interesting how this is the first major real confrontation between a global Internet and a global government system, and the resultant manhunt is from every paranoid thriller that emerges from Hollywood.

It’s also interesting how the world governments didn’t react or kick into gear when they released the US war logs, but did kick in over diplomatic cables.

While wikileaks has revealed interesting things, so far most people have seemingly just shrugged and moved on – and the revelations have caused people to lose their jobs in democratic countries – goodness knows what the effects will be in less “progressive” places.

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (evil)

Unfortunately, I’ve found myself following this thought process before when it comes to updating social media. And yet, I still don’t get paid for doing it. Harumph.

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (evil)

After Morrissey called the Chinese a sub-species, quite a few people wondered why the British-Chinese weren’t getting upset or starting demonstrations against his words.

Is it a uniquely British-Chinese thing that we just don’t seem to get upset over anything? Or indeed, particularly inspired to help British-Chinese people get into Parliament, or even our local council?

Thankfully, it would seem not as this interview with American-based The Angry Asian Man proves… Mind you, he’s at pains to emphasise that he’s not an angry person himself…

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (Default)

Imagine you logged into your social network of choice (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) and discovered that your list of friends and contacts had been changed by the social network to reflect who THEY thought you should be following, as opposed to who you had chosen.


That’s exactly what seems to be happening with Yammer, a social network aimed more at intranets and behind company firewalls.


Having used Yammer at work to have a vague idea as to what colleagues across the company are doing and interested in, they decided to send me an email this morning saying that as “My Feed” followed everyone, they were going to unilaterally unfollow everyone on my behalf.


Well, I don’t want that to happen. But helpfully, the only way – it would seem – to protest this decision is to make a meagre posting on their uservoice customer forum.


Disgraceful behaviour.


Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (evil)

Imagine you logged into your social network of choice (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) and discovered that your list of friends and contacts had been changed by the social network to reflect who THEY thought you should be following, as opposed to who you had chosen.

That’s exactly what seems to be happening with Yammer, a social network aimed more at intranets and behind company firewalls. They recently sent me an email that said:

Having used Yammer at work to have a vague idea as to what colleagues across the company are doing and interested in, they decided to send me an email this morning saying that as “My Feed” followed everyone, they were going to unilaterally unfollow everyone on my behalf.

“Here’s the thing: as Yammer networks grow in companies, we’ve learned a few things. We’ve learned that as your company network gets bigger, Following Everyone can clutter up your MyFeed and impair your ability to find what’s most relevant to you.

On Friday, October 29th, you will stop following everyone in your network. Before then, you can start following updates from specific people at *** by clicking here.

This way your MyFeed will be focused on the messages that matter to you most.”

Well, I don’t want that to happen. But helpfully, the only way – it would seem – to protest this decision is to make a meagre posting on their uservoice customer forum.

Disgraceful behaviour.

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (evil)

LinkedIn has become the defacto premiere website for making business connections, so as a consequence all these groups have sprung up promising to connect you to more and more people. I joined a few groups, but they weren’t quite what I was looking for. So I wanted to leave a group.

You’d have thought a website dedicated to business professionals would make it easy to do what you need to do – like leaving a group. But oh no.

You can’t leave a group from your group settings page. Oh no, that’d be far too obvious.

Instead, you have to go to a listing of all your groups, and click on the tiny word that says Actions by each link. And I had to do that by consulting the Help page.

LinkedIn, sort it out!

(Headline courtesy of @suitov)

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (Default)



Yahoo! Ping Pong-23

Originally uploaded by Ping London

(In other words, great, you got sponsorship, where’s the return?)

Across London, ping pong tables have sprouted up to encourage Londoners to have a go at ping pong/whiff whaff. All nicely decorated with the various sponsors’ logos, including Yahoo!

Accompanying these tables are some leaflets about the Ping London project, which also – of course – encourage you to share your participation, by using Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or maybe even Flickr

Note that of those four websites, only one belongs to Yahoo – one of the main sponsors.

Surely a major dotcom company, upon committing some sponsorship money to a project, would want their websites or services to be promoted – perhaps Buzz or Pulse – alongside the rest of the web offerings?

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (Default)

Edit: Ahhh, the author behind The Handmaid’s Tale. Must read it one day.

I write like
Margaret Atwood

I Write Like by Mémoires, Mac journal software. Analyze your writing!

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (Default)

Edit: Ahhh, the author behind The Handmaid’s Tale. Must read it one day.

I write like
Margaret Atwood

I Write Like by Mémoires, Mac journal software. Analyze your writing!

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (Default)

Sarah Cameron not quite standing by her man, David Cameron
 


So… on the night when David Cameron finally became Prime Minister, HyperHam and I had the following conversation:

HH: “Why is Mrs Cameron standing at the back, pregnant and far away from her husband?”
AW: “Well, we’re living in Tory times now.”

To me, this was so amazingly funny and of-the-moment, that I immediately posted it on Twitter and Facebook. After all, what’s a joke if it’s not instantly shared to as many people as possible?

While a couple of friends graciously shared the joke with credit, another friend of mine reposted the joke without attributing it towards me. Indeed, when I pointed out that I wrote the joke, she deleted the comment, and then we had a slight disagreement before she decided to delete the joke to begin with. But she genuinely thought she was in the right to just copy a joke without any form of attribution.

Record companies and artists everywhere bemoan how we now live in an age where people copy works without even thinking of paying for it. But at least we all know a song by Lady GaGa is by Lady GaGa. How soon is it going to be before people can’t even be bothered to acknowledge that someone else wrote that song or book or joke?

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (Default)

Sarah Cameron not quite standing by her man, David Cameron

So… on the night when David Cameron finally became Prime Minister, HyperHam and I had the following conversation:

HH: “Why is Mrs Cameron standing at the back, pregnant and far away from her husband?”
AW: “Well, we’re living in Tory times now.”

To me, this was so amazingly funny and of-the-moment, that I immediately posted it on Twitter and Facebook. After all, what’s a joke if it’s not instantly shared to as many people as possible?

While a couple of friends graciously shared the joke with credit, another friend of mine reposted the joke without attributing it towards me. Indeed, when I pointed out that I wrote the joke, she deleted the comment, and then we had a slight disagreement before she decided to delete the joke to begin with. But she genuinely thought she was in the right to just copy a joke without any form of attribution.

Record companies and artists everywhere bemoan how we now live in an age where people copy works without even thinking of paying for it. But at least we all know a song by Lady GaGa is by Lady GaGa. How soon is it going to be before people can’t even be bothered to acknowledge that someone else wrote that song or book or joke?

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (Default)

You’d have thought that linking from a website to another website would be a basic principle in building websites. Even the BBC seems to agree – its’ latest Strategy Review states that “BBC Online will be transformed into a window on the web with, by 2012, an external link on every page and at least double the current rate of ‘click-throughs’ to external sites.”

Except OFCOM, the commerical broadcast regulator, has reprimanded GMTV for essentially linking to another website from its’ main website.

During a broadcast, viewers were invited to apply for free gym passes via GMTV’s website. Once they got there, they were told to click through to moneysavingexpert.com to pick up the gym passes. Ofcom said this is effectively promoting Lewis’s business and breaches rule 10.3 of the broadcasting code which states products and services must not be promoted in programmes.

Hrm…

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (Default)

So Google Buzz has launched, and I’ve had a quick play with it.

Unfortunately, it’s done the same thing as many recent Google product launches – it hasn’t brought anything new to the table, aside from the sheer gargantuan amount of data it stores about me. And the only reason it has so much data about me is because I’m pretty much wedded to Google, thanks to their still-superlative Gmail service (tabs instead of categories for email! It’s the future, I tell you!) and consequently, me adopting every other Google service there is, including their mobile phone system.

Which of course has its consequences. Within an hour of using Buzz, I found 10 people following me who were total strangers, who I’d never heard from before. This happens a lot more on Twitter (and to a certain extent on Facebook), but because those services don’t touch my email, it doesn’t seem so sinister. But with Buzz integrating with my email account, it does. There is a suggestion that these strangers found me via Google Profiles and that I ought to switch it off – but I’m quasi-reluctant to do that since otherwise, I could disappear off Google search results. (Then again, my name isn’t exactly my brand these days)

The huge flaw, of course, with integrating social networking so tightly with email, is that everyone’s email boxes are already groaning under the strain of spam, newsletters and the other ways people are trying to reach us via email. Adding another system to your email just adds to the risk of people declaring Inbox Surrender and leaving email alone entirely.

Ultimately, it’s hard to see why Google made another attempt into social networking, after the days of Orkut. They’ve built a new private members club opposite the most popular pub in town, spied upon everyone going into the pub to try and connect everyone, and then … just opened the front door – only letting in people who are members of the club. No special offers, no enticements, no new jukebox in the corner, nothing. There’s nothing in Buzz that isn’t already on other social networking sites – and of course, nothing that beats their main enemies, Facebook or Twitter. and ironically, they seem to be quite swamped – picking up blog posts and Twitter feeds from other areas of my digital life seems to take a day.

But like the famed Hotel California, once I’ve checked in, I can’t seem to leave…

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (Default)

So Google Buzz has launched, and I’ve had a quick play with it.

Unfortunately, it’s done the same thing as many recent Google product launches – it hasn’t brought anything new to the table, aside from the sheer gargantuan amount of data it stores about me. And the only reason it has so much data about me is because I’m pretty much wedded to Google, thanks to their still-superlative Gmail service (tabs instead of categories for email! It’s the future, I tell you!) and consequently, me adopting every other Google service there is, including their mobile phone system.

Which of course has its consequences. Within an hour of using Buzz, I found 10 people following me who were total strangers, who I’d never heard from before. This happens a lot more on Twitter (and to a certain extent on Facebook), but because those services don’t touch my email, it doesn’t seem so sinister. But with Buzz integrating with my email account, it does. There is a suggestion that these strangers found me via Google Profiles and that I ought to switch it off – but I’m quasi-reluctant to do that since otherwise, I could disappear off Google search results. (Then again, my name isn’t exactly my brand these days)

The huge flaw, of course, with integrating social networking so tightly with email, is that everyone’s email boxes are already groaning under the strain of spam, newsletters and the other ways people are trying to reach us via email. Adding another system to your email just adds to the risk of people declaring Inbox Surrender and leaving email alone entirely.

Ultimately, it’s hard to see why Google made another attempt into social networking, after the days of Orkut. They’ve built a new private members club opposite the most popular pub in town, spied upon everyone going into the pub to try and connect everyone, and then … just opened the front door – only letting in people who are members of the club. No special offers, no enticements, no new jukebox in the corner, nothing. There’s nothing in Buzz that isn’t already on other social networking sites – and of course, nothing that beats their main enemies, Facebook or Twitter. and ironically, they seem to be quite swamped – picking up blog posts and Twitter feeds from other areas of my digital life seems to take a day.

But like the famed Hotel California, once I’ve checked in, I can’t seem to leave…

Mirrored from almost witty.

almostwitty: (Default)

In the art of experimenting with new websites and new forms of communication, a new website has sprung me which allows you, the humble web surfer, to ask me anything at all. And to do it anonymously, if you so wish.

Of course, there are many ways to do that, but with this website, any answers I choose to give are made public.

So give it a go, and ask me anything you want and tell me what you thought of the experience. Of course, I naturally reserve the right not to tell you incredibly sensitive private information, like my shoe size.

Interestingly so far, most people have asked their questions anonymously. Although I know who you are…

Mirrored from almost witty.

Profile

almostwitty: (Default)
almostwitty

June 2017

S M T W T F S
     123
45678910
1112131415 1617
18192021222324
2526 27282930 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 24th, 2017 06:45 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios